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FIREPLACES

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ELECTRIC FIREPLACE

The electric fireplace creates warmth by heating interior coils with electricity. Most models come with an internal fan to better distribute heat throughout your home. Given that there is no real flame inside an electric fireplace, they employ a “fake” flame to give them a lifelike look and feel. It’s common for the flickering flame to be paired with a crackling “fake” log.

ELECTRIC
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GAS FIREPLACE

Like electric fireplaces, gas fireplaces are a low-cost option that’s usually easy to install. Built-in options can be installed with little reconstruction to an existing built-in fireplace and chimney. At the same time that they’re affordable up front, gas fireplaces are also highly efficient. They’re a good choice to save money on your overall heating utilities bills.

GAS
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ETHANOL FIREPLACES

An ethanol fireplace is very similar to a gel fireplace, except that it uses a liquid bioethanol fuel instead of a gel fuel. Most ethanol fireplaces contain a burner that can be filled with the bioethanol fuel for easy repeated use. 2 liters is the standard size for the fuel tank. The burner enables you to adjust the temperature of the fireplace (unlike a gel fireplace). It also allows you to easily turn the fireplace off and on.

ETHNOL
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WOOD-BURNING ​FIREPLACE

Good old wood-burning fireplaces are the most traditional type of fireplace. In fact, some form of a wood-burning fireplace is what humans have been using to stay warm for years. Chances are the image of a wood-burning fireplace is what pops into your head when you think about a fireplace to begin with. As the name implies, a wood-burning fireplace burns wood to create heat. Though a crackling or roaring fire is the result, this heat source comes with a lot of downsides. The biggest downside to wood-burning fireplaces is cost and maintenance. They’re expensive to install, buying wood adds up, and professional cleaning is required on a regular basis.

WOD-BURNING
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FREE-STANDING FIREPLACES

Depending on the type of fuel used, your free-standing fireplace can be completely free-standing or attached to the wall or ceiling (for ventilation). Electric free-standing models that don’t require ventilation can actually be moved around while redecorating. Gas free-standing fireplaces that require ventilation or a gas line should probably stay in the same place. Free-standing fireplaces come in numerous designs, ranging from contemporary to modern to rustic. They also come in all different shapes and sizes.

FREE-STANDING
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WALL-MOUNTED  ​FIREPLACE

A wall-mounted fireplace is another common option for those with small homes or apartments. There are two subtypes of wall-mounted fireplaces: those that need to be connected to a chimney and those that don’t. The type you get depends on what type of fuel you use. Wall-mounted fireplaces come in dozens of shapes, styles, and sizes. One popular style these days is the long type which is called a ribbon fireplace. You can buy one with a mantel or without a mantel.

WALL MOUNTED
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HANGING FIREPLACES

Also known as "floating fireplaces", floating hearths sit underneath the fireplace and “float” above the ground with empty space below. They are perfect for homeowners who want a modern look. Even if you have little to no space in your house, we can still outfit your fireplaces with a new hearth.

HANGING
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TWO-SIDED  ​FIREPLACE

Double-sided fireplaces require double the space—and offer double the warmth. Often contemporary in style, a grand double-sided fireplace works best in open-concept areas and indoor/outdoor rooms, in which it creates multiple, aesthetically cohesive spaces connected through the fireplace wall.

TWO SIDED
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TRADITIONAL FIREPLACE

Usually constructed from stones or bricks, these fireplaces bring nature into the home, creating a rustic, cozy atmosphere. Most traditional fireplaces are the wood-burning variety. However, a wood-burning fireplace can easily be outfitted with an electric or gas fireplace insert if desired.

TRADITIONAL
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LEDGESTONE ​FIREPLACE

Ledgestone gives your fireplace the appearance of a “dry fit” or “dry stack” installation. This means that the pieces of stone are installed tightly fitted together, without grout or another material separating them. This is part of what gives Ledgestone its character and its beauty.

LEDGESTONE
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BRICK & WOOD  ​FIREPLACE

Exposed brick gives your fireplace a timeless, traditional style. Combine with wood millwork and a wood mantel for an updated, contemporary design.

BRICK & WOOD
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MARBLE ​FIREPLACE

Marble is one of the most popular natural stone materials used in interior design. Because of these properties, marble is the perfect choice for stone fireplaces. Whether it is a marble fireplace mantel or an entire marble fireplace surround, the natural stone will look incredible and be able to withstand the heat.

MARBLE
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MANTEL

The mantel, or mantelpiece, is the decorative framework often found around a fireplace. Both built-in and stand-alone (as well as wall-mounted) fireplaces often utilize mantels, though a fireplace doesn’t necessarily need one. In addition to providing that classic fireplace look, a fireplace mantel is also functional. It can serve as a shelf for decorations and other items.

MANTEL
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OPEN-HEARTH  ​FIREPLACE

Also known as an open hearth fireplace, these are usually made out of stone or brick and are built into your home’s wall. They utilize a chimney and flue for ventilation. A traditional fireplace is the most expensive mounting option. If you don’t already have one installed in your home, it’s going to take a lot of construction to properly build one. For this reason, most people pass on a traditional open hearth fireplace unless their home was originally constructed with one.

OPEN-HEARTH
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